How do I get an Order of Protection and Restraining Order in Rockland County: Rockland County Family Court in New City

Some people might wonder how to get an order of Protection and a restraining order in Rockland County. The questions regarding this type of thing all come down to the same basic thing. If you reside in Rockland County, and you are a victim of certain criminal acts, then you can petition the court to give you a temporary order of protection.

How do I get an Order of Protection and Restraining Order in Rockland County: Rockland County Family Court in New City

20170111 – DEA must end its informant program now

The DEA must now end its informant program. For many years, the the drug enforcement administration of the United States has engaged in questionable use of thousands of informants. The people they used ranged from airline workers to staff at other government agencies. That violates the Justice Department policies. They tried to get around the 4th amendment.

20170111 – DEA must end its informant program now

What is the difference between a misdemeanor and a felony

Many people understand that a felony is far more serious than a misdemeanor but not many people understand further details beyond that. However, there are significant differences between felonies and misdemeanors under the law. If you are facing criminal charges, it is important to understand the differences.

While the information contained here will offer some important insight, it is good to be aware that it is not designed to replace one on one consultation with a lawyer about your particular situation.

The law treats misdemeanors and felonies differently. The most significant difference is power of imprisonment and the severity of the penalty.

What is the difference between a misdemeanor and a felony

It is good to note that the distinction is not due to the conviction of a particular crime being punished by a particular jail term. The difference comes in whether the person convicted can be punished in a specific prison or for a particular length of time.Click here to read some more serious crimes and your criminal rights

The definition of a felony varies between states. States in which capital punishment is still legal, define felonies as all crimes punishable by death. Other states define felonies as those crimes that attract a prison term exceeding one year. Still other states define felonies as those crimes punishable by imprisonment in a state prison.

Misdemeanors are defined as those crimes punishable by a sentence not exceeding one year in a local county jail or prison. Misdemeanors are also punishable by fines in some cases. Some states such as California have crimes known as wobblers that can be charged as either felonies or misdemeanors depending on the situation.

While misdemeanors and felonies have many apparent differences, the procedural prosecution still remains the same across the board. Both criminal charges require the prosecution to bring charges forth against the person, which are subject to legal proceeding thereafter. The prosecution is then required to follow additional federal protocols when prosecuting felonies.

A felony conviction typically results in a loss of rights for the individual. The person convicted of a felony loses the right to obtain some licenses or even to possess firearms. Some states will even prohibit convicted felons from voting. Convicted felons are bound by the law to disclose their history when they are applying for jobs, which makes it hard for them to find jobs. People convicted of misdemeanors don’t experience any of that.

First Degree Murder, Second Degree Murder, or Manslaughter?

If you are facing criminal charges, it can be the most difficult time of your life. This can also be emotionally taxing if the criminal charges involve the death of another person. However, there is a distinct difference between murder and manslaughter, and if you are facing such charges, it is important that you understand such differences. With this in mind, read on and consider these points so that you understand a bit about each and how they can determine the way the rest of the process plays out.

What is the main difference between murder and manslaughter?

When someone is charged with homicide, they are indicted or arraigned before the court on either murder or manslaughter charges. Manslaughter charges are considered in cases when the defendant is accused of being responsible for someone’s death but did not pre-meditate the actions which caused the death. Manslaughter largely involves accidental death. This can happen a lot of different ways, such as hitting someone with a car, allowing someone to die due to one’s own recklessness or failing to ensure their safety. Second- degree murder involves intent to harm, attack or even kill but is usually a reaction to intense anger or fear in an unforeseen situation. First-degree murder on the other hand is planned and premeditated.

First Degree Murder, Second Degree Murder, or Manslaughter?

In most situations, manslaughter can either be voluntary or involuntary. Voluntary manslaughter involves a situation by which you did not have premeditated intent to kill a person, while involuntary manslaughter involves a situation by which the killing was an accident. Visit http://www.criminal-defense-lawyer-bronx.com/knowing-criminal-rights/ to know more about your criminal rights.

These circumstances are punished completely differently. For example, murder is almost always punished with up to life imprisonment or capital punishment, depending on the severity of the crime and the state in which a person is sentenced. In most situations, manslaughter cases are punished with a lot more leniency.

In both situations, it is often up to the jury to decide the punishment of the crime and the severity of the situation. They will look into the terms of each case to determine whether or not the defendant is responsible for the death and what sort of sentence is fitting. In most situations, the judge will pass down sentencing guidelines that the jury can follow. They would then convene and look over all of the terms of the sentencing guidelines to see which factors come into play when considering the punishment that the defendant receives.